SONIA SOTOMAYOR WILL NEVER SIT ON THE “SUPREME COURT” 07/14/2009


by Moody Adams
The major religious issue involving Sonia Sotomayor is that her confirmation would give us six Catholics on the Court.

While her rulings are up for debate, her church-state rulings show she is against the government interfering with church issues. In a “ministerial exception,” she ruled a church body violated a federal age discrimination statute. Sotomayor said the federal statute did not apply in his case. She said it would violate the First Amendment for a court to intervene in a job dispute between a religious body and a member of its clergy.

But, to use the words “Supreme Court” in reference to America’s highest court is to use the words rather loosely. The dictionary defines “supreme” as: “highest in rank or authority; paramount; sovereign; chief.”

It was important to America’s founders that the nation understand that God is the Supreme Judge. The Declaration of Independence states, “We, therefore, the representatives of the United States of America, in general Congress assembled,appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions.” They appealed to the Supreme Judge of the entire world for help in founding this nation. (Rectitude is another word we don’t use any more. Synonyms for this word are “righteousness, morality, goodness, correctness, decency, integrity.)"

The difference between America’s founders and many of today’s leaders is the founders had found “righteousness, morality, goodness, correctness, decency, and integrity” in the one True God of Heaven.

The famous Westminster Confession of Faith, recognized by America’s founders and major religious bodies, appeals for God’s judgment in chapter 5, vs. 6, “As for those wicked and ungodly men whom God, as a righteous Judge, for former sins, doth blind and harden...”

If Sonia Sotomayor is confirmed, every Christian should pray for her to make wise, just decisions that please God, the Supreme Judge, not any political party.


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