OUR TEENS DO NOT KNOW WHAT IS RIGHT FROM WRONG 03/02/2011


by Moody Adams
Neidi Stevens has written an article on how cell phones cameras, Internet-enabled hand-held devices and other technology has made it easy to beat the system. Downloading songs and passing them around without paying seems o.k.

Twenty-three percent of students said storing notes on a phone to access during a test is not cheating. Nineteen percent said downloading a paper from the Internet and turning it in as your own writing is not cheating.

William Kilpatrick, a professor at Boston University, has a book out titled “Why Johnny Can’t tell Right From Wrong." He “believes that if the fundamental teachings of what is right and wrong are in place, rather than letting children choose their own value systems based on 'feelings' (the educational movement of the sixties), children will develop a better sense of self, family, and community rather than a sense of confusion.”

The rejection of absolute morals, absolute rights and wrongs, is not new. Four thousand years ago, Israel degenerated into such a state: "In those days there was no king in Israel, but every man did that which was right in his own eyes” (Judges 17:6).

It is imperative that parents and churches stress that the Bible is God’s Book of Absolute Truth.



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